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Thoughtful contributions to the Globe at War are not just welcomed, but encouraged, including via; a community generated articles page, book and other media reviews, and much more. The Globe at War offers ample opportunities to learn about World War I, World War II, The Cold War, and the current wars for control over global resources and opinions.

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"Why Germany Nearly Won: A New History of the Second World War in Europe" is now available for purchase in the United Kingdom. 

You may order the book through Amazon UK, Casemate, Foyles, and Waterstones.

The Red Army vs. Army Group North - Early 1943

on Wed, 08/17/2011 - 21:26


When discussing the January 1943 fighting between Germany and the Soviet Union the overwhelming majority of today's literature focuses on events at Stalingrad. In doing so, a major disservice is done to history, for in the first three months of 1943 the Red Army attempted to crush the German Sixteenth Army and Army Group North much as it had eliminated the German Sixth Army and attempted to destroy the German Army Groups in Southern Russia.

In Northwestern Russia the nearly one and one half year long German siege of Leningrad had precipitated yet another Russian relief attempt when the Second

Beda Fomm

on Wed, 08/17/2011 - 21:21

Italy joined Germany's war on June 11, 1940 when Mussolini opportunistically declared war on the seemingly defeated British and shattered French states. Mussolini hoped to share in German victory over France; he did, but in the process made several monumental errors that squandered what should have been a powerful addition to Germany's war effort.

Mussolini's greatest error, beyond siding with Germany, was his overambitious foreign policy.

The Fall 1944 Struggle Along Germany's Western Border

on Wed, 08/17/2011 - 21:15

The fall of 1944 ranks among the most difficult months the United States Army experienced in the entire 20th Century, if not her entire history. Along the center of the Allied front, along the German border near the medieval city of Aachen, General Hodges VII and V Corps endured one shattered rifle division after another. Aachen was the first significant German city the allies captured in the war, with a population of 165,000 people. Though the city itself was secured on October 21st heavy fighting raged on regardless; in the primeval Huertgen Forest blanketing the hills surrounding Aachen.

El Alamein - October 1942

on Wed, 08/17/2011 - 21:10

In October 1942 yet another tipping point had arrived in the two year battle fought between Axis armies led by German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel and the British Eighth Army. Although at one time or another each combatant army had won an advantage over its foe, this time Lieutenant General Bernard Law Montgomery's British Eighth Army stood ready to hammer Rommel's PanzerArmee - woefully overextended at the end of a deeply frayed line of supply across the North African desert.

The turn of events that would lead to El Alamein had begun late in the spring of 1942, when Rommel's army badly

Hitler's Manufactured Pretext for War

on Wed, 08/17/2011 - 21:04

The Second World War ended well over 60 million lives in six of the most horrific and brutal years in history. Today, we remember the war's beginning, exactly seventy years ago this September, mostly from the perspective of the German war machine's blitzkrieg across Poland. However, what is often forgotten is that even a tyrant such as Hitler still sought political cover for his war of expansion and extermination in Eastern Europe.

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