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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Feb 14 2017 - 12:30am

Last week I examined the U-boat war in the Arctic. This week I'd like to turn your attention roughly 2,000 miles to the south. There in the Black Sea, the Soviet Navy faced off against the Axis powers in a poorly understood war that nevertheless featured: amphibious landings, to big-gun fire support for ground forces, convoys, sea-control, sea-denial, anti-ship, ASW, mine, and submarine warfare.

In this article we shall look at the battle beneath the waves.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Sep 1 2016 - 3:23pm

Sorry for the break. It has been a busy summer, but you can now expect a return to regular blogging and articles. To get back into the swing of things I just wanted to highlight for you once more why I fear the US military's position as the planet's dominant military power is slipping to something less (a topic I discussed in my last post before my summer vacation). The labor day celebration of this nation's industrial strength is upon us, so in beginning to answer this question let's focus on

Review Type: F-22, F-35, LCS, Lockheed Martin
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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: May 31 2016 - 8:17pm

Another Memorial Day has come and gone, and I'm feeling a bit more melancholic than usual. That's for a number of reasons, including an old one: The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. It appears that many of the things I was very much afraid of happening are coming to pass as a result of the F-35's bloated impact on the defense budget. And this means one thing. The troops are taking it on the chin.

Don't believe me? Several seemingly unrelated news items are demonstrating quite clearly the cracks in

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Apr 20 2016 - 8:16pm

When most people think of the Red Army circa 1942 they imagine a war machine on the rise, and blessed with fleets of wordclass T-34 medium tanks.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Mar 23 2016 - 8:49pm

Many of you may know that I was born and raised in Michigan. Every once in a while I like to highlight that fact by focusing on Michigan's contribution to our nation's defense during WWII.

For instance, did you know that the federal government granted Michigan contractors ten percent of U.S. spending on war related purchases. This meant Michigan garnered the second most war related funding of any state (The State of New York came in first). What did that money buy? Quite a bit.

Perhaps most

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Feb 29 2016 - 6:10pm

The Michigan War Studies Review (MiWSR) has just published my latest book review. It is of David Stahel's The Battle for Moscow, and unfortunately it is a work that I cannot recommend. This is only the second time I have had to publish a negative review with the MiWSR. Readers will quickly see why.

It is patently obvious that Stahel's latest work is more interested in pushing an agenda.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Dec 30 2015 - 6:53pm

Dr. Boris Sokolov's Marshal K.K. Rokossovsky offers a unique look at not only the life of one of the Red Army's top Second World War era senior officers, but also interesting insight into a Red Army at war.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Nov 8 2015 - 3:56pm

The World War Two era USS Independence (CVL-22) was one of many US Navy ships to carry the name independence (leading up to today's Littoral Combat Ship: LCS-2). What made this Independence unique was that it was the lead ship in a class of light aircraft carriers produced from converted cruisers.

What many forget today is that in 1941 the US Navy was desperate to find additional decks to support its existing carrier fleet, which throughout the first years of the Second World War was

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Sep 22 2015 - 12:44pm

The Michigan War Studies Review has published my review of Rolf-Dieter Müller's Enemy in the East: Hitler's Secret Plans to Invade the Soviet Union. This book offers an intriguing look at the origins of German planning for an invasion of the Soviet Union, and the place of Poland in those plans. Anyone interested in this aspect of the war should find this book quite enjoyable.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Sep 3 2015 - 4:40pm

The Michigan War Studies Review has published my review of Peter Caddick-Adam's Snow and Steel: The Battle of the Bulge, 1944–45. This is quite possibly the best book I have read on the subject, and that is saying something (given the sheer number of studies I have read).

If you are interested in how and why Hitler's final great Western Front offensive was an abject failure then this is the book for you. Finally, if The Battle of the Bulge holds a special place of interest for you then please

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