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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: May 25 2015 - 12:57pm

When we think of the U.S. Marine Corps and World War II we all too often think of grand amphibious assaults at places like Tarawa or Iwo Jima. Rarely do we consider that the U.S. Marine Corps was, and is, more than a bunch of highly trained light infantry. So on this year's Memorial Day I would like to remind our readers of a few of the U.S. Marine Corps stunning Second World War aviation accomplishments.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: May 5 2015 - 9:35pm

The Third Reich's last week is often described as a lightly contested race between the Allied and Soviet armies to see who could secure the most territory. The reality was anything but so simple. What many Americans don't appreciate is that the vicious fighting characterizing the Nazi-Soviet conflict continued well past the official end of the war.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Apr 10 2015 - 5:08pm

I am happy to report Why Germany Nearly Won has landed another positive review. This time it comes from Historyofwar.org.

The website's well regarded Second World War historians (website editor Peter Antill has authored three World War II books with Osprey, and his co-editors also have solid credentials) endorsed my work as seen in the following excerpt from their full review:

"Mercatante's main argument is that quality was more important than quantity when attempting to explain the course of

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Jan 27 2015 - 10:37pm

Today, Tuesday January 27th, is International Holocaust Remembrance Day. It has been 70 years since the Red Army liberated Auschwitz-Birkenau on January 27, 1945.

Auschwitz is actually more than just one camp. At its peak it included a network of dozens of camps all built and operated during World War II by Hitler's Third Reich in Silesia in occupied Poland. Auschwitz I and nearby Auschwitz II-Birkenau were the two main camps.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Dec 20 2014 - 2:40pm

Our latest review is published. Take Budapest! The Struggle for Hungary Autumn 1944 is a book any enthusiast of armored warfare should enjoy. Check out the review here.
 

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Nov 12 2014 - 2:11am

Known as "America's Flagship" and one of the fastest ships in the Navy (in spite of her 82,538 ton full load displacement), the USS Constellation (CV-64) was a Kitty Hawk Class Supercarrier whose crews served in some of the most important US military engagements of the Cold War era and the decade that followed. Commissioned on October 27, 1961 and decommissioned on August 6, 2003 the "Connie" (as she was known by her crews) is probably best known for her service during the Vietnam War.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Oct 17 2014 - 6:37pm

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

In the summer of 1914, the Great Powers of Europe plunged into the first of two calamitous world wars.   This year, as part of the efforts to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the Great War, the National Archives of the United Kingdom, the Imperial War Museum and Zooniverse have teamed up for Operation War Diary.  The goal of this online archival project is to open up greater access to records of the Great War for historians and the general public.

Launched earlier

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Oct 14 2014 - 10:12pm

I just finished Norbert Szamveber’s Waffen-SS Armour in Normandy. The book review can be found here.

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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Oct 3 2014 - 3:11pm

I just finished Tomb of the Panzerwaffe: The Defeat of the Sixth SS Panzer Army in Hungary 1945 and really enjoyed it. You can read the full review here.

 
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Submitted by
Steve Mercatante
on: Sep 16 2014 - 8:08pm

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

This week marks the 100th Anniversary of the First Battle of the Aisne, a pivotal battle which marked a major transformation in the nature of fighting on the Western Front during the First World War.   Among the many German, French and British units that fought on the Aisne River was the 1st Battalion / Royal Highlanders.

After the outbreak of war, German armies swept through Belgium and across the French frontier in accordance with a plan commonly named for Field

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