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Thoughtful contributions to the Globe at War are not just welcomed, but encouraged, including via; a community generated articles page, book and other media reviews, and much more. The Globe at War offers ample opportunities to learn about World War I, World War II, The Cold War, and the current wars for control over global resources and opinions.

The Globe at War features article submissions, book reviews and photo galleries that include short descriptions for each photograph posted as well as a regularly updated blog. In addition please enjoy our news feed; updated daily and focusing on international military affairs. Whether you are a student, teacher, academic, current or retired professional from a defense related field, or a military history buff, we look forward to your participation and welcome you to The Globe at War.


"Why Germany Nearly Won: A New History of the Second World War in Europe" is now available for purchase in the United Kingdom. 

You may order the book through Amazon UK, Casemate, Foyles, and Waterstones.

Race to Save World's Last Known Do-17

on Fri, 11/04/2011 - 21:45

Lying underwater in the English Channel off the coast of Kent, United Kingdom is the world's last known surviving Do-17 bomber. In a joint attempt the Royal Air Force Museum and Imperial College of London are attempting to salvage the well preserved Do-17 - found in 2010 after sands shifted that had previously hidden the bomber, and have now left it exposed to seawater that can corrode the aircraft very quickly. Shot down during the height of the Battle of Britain this aircraft, as the last of its kind, is of considerable historical importance.

Built by Dornier Flugzeugwerke, the twin engine

Final Voyage of the World's Last Battleship Begins

on Tue, 11/01/2011 - 16:38

Late last week the USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship in the final class of US battleships ever built, began a voyage from Suisun Bay, California that will ultimately end in Los Angeles - where she will serve as a floating museum.

Laid down in June 1940 and commissioned in February 1943 the Iowa weighed in at 45,000 tons, was 887 feet long and included a crew of over 2,750 officers and men. Her potent main armament of nine 16 inch (406mm) guns could rain one ton shells down onto targets over 20 miles away.

Japanese Submarine Wreck Found at Papua New Guinea

on Sat, 10/29/2011 - 12:56

Australian and New Zealand warships clearing World War II era munitions from the harbor at Rabaul have found what is believed to be a Japanese midget submarine. The wreck was found sitting upright on the sandy bottom at 180 feet underwater. Rabaul was one of the most important Japanese Naval bases during the War, and the site of sharp combat in January 1942 - when Japanese forces seized the harbor and associated military installations from Australian forces.

New Investigation Being Opened Into Auschwitz Crimes

on Fri, 10/28/2011 - 14:57

Polish authorities have ordered a new investigation into the crimes against humanity committed at the Auschwitz concentration camp during World War II. The Germans murdered an estimated 1.5 million people at Auschwitz, located near Krakow, until the Red Army libereated the camp late in January 1945. 

The crimes committed at Auschwitz were central to Nazi Germany's plans to create lebensraum in Eastern Europe - to be done mostly at the expense of the Slavic and Jewish people, though hundreds of thousands of Roma and other peoples characterized as "sub-human" were also murdered.

Last Surviving Polish Battle of Britain Pilot Dies

on Wed, 10/26/2011 - 22:58

Brigadier General Tadeusz Sawicz died on 19 October at a nursing home in Toronto, Canada - he was 97 years old and was the last surviving Polish pilot to have fought with the RAF during the 1940 Battle of Britain. Sawicz was one of 145 Polish pilots who fought with the RAF during the Battle of Britain and was credited with three kills during his service with the RAF.

Overall, The Battle of Britain represented a disaster for the Luftwaffe and a blow to the prestige of the Wehrmacht as a whole.

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