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on: Aug 20 2014 - 5:19pm

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

Of all the U.S. Army units to serve in Czechoslovakia during 1945, none was as combat experienced as the 1st Infantry Division.  From the assault landing at Oran, Algeria on 8 November 1942 to V-E Day in north-west Czechoslovakia on 8 May 1945, the “Big Red One” spent an astonishing 443 days in combat across two continents.

on: Jul 25 2014 - 4:35pm

As we approach the 70th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising I thought it would be appropriate to set the stage for the brave but doomed efforts of the Polish Resistance to free their city from Nazi occupation. Late in July of 1944 and as the Red Army approached Warsaw's outskirts it must have seemed as if the Soviet war machine was unstoppable. Alas, this would prove not to be true.

Even though much of the blame for the failure of the Polish Resistance to overcome their Nazi overlords must be

on: Mar 20 2013 - 4:03pm

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

Introduction

On the morning of 7 May 1945 and as the Third Reich collapsed, soldiers of Combat Command A (CCA), U.S. 9th Armored Division mounted up their vehicles and resumed their advance eastward further into north-western Czechoslovakia.  Temporarily attached to the 1st Infantry Division, CCA’s mission was to liberate the Czech city of Karlovy Vary.  CCA’s task forces rolled forward against negligible German resistance.

on: Mar 2 2013 - 6:49pm

By Bryan J Dickerson*

Prologue – Plzen, Czech Republic, Saturday 6 May 2000,

On this warm sunny day, I stood among several hundred people who had gathered on Husova Street; several blocks from Plzen’s Republic Square.  55 years ago on this very day, soldiers of the U.S. 16th Armored Division had rolled into Plzen and liberated its people from six oppressive years of German occupation (pictured here - Photo Courtesy of Jaroslav Peklo).  Later on that same day, other soldiers from the U.S.

on: Feb 26 2013 - 2:14am

By Nigel Askey*

The technical superiority of the T-34 (with a T-34/76 pictured here) in 1941,and during WWII in general has become the stuff of legend. Its apparent superiority has become so entrenched in the psyche of post WWII authors that it is now assumed without question. Some go as far as to claim the T-34 as “the finest tank of the twentieth century”, and that the T-34 “rendered the entire fleet of German tanks as effectively obsolete”.[1]

However, if battle performance was, and indeed

on: Jan 31 2013 - 12:56am

By Lieutenant Colonel James T. McGhee*

“I swear to you, Adolf Hitler, as Fuhrer and Reichschancellor, loyalty and bravery.  I vow to you, and those you have named to command me, obedience unto death, so help me God.”[1]  

This oath, taken by each member of the Waffen SS, summarized their unflinching obedience to Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler.

on: Jan 24 2013 - 4:55pm

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

After nearly seven years of providing essential aviation ground support (AGS) functions for Marine and U.S. aviation in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the Marine Corps AGS mission ended on 23 January 2010 when the II Marine Expeditionary Force turned over responsibility for the Al Anbar Province to the U.S. Army.

on: Jan 21 2013 - 7:34pm

By Larry Parker*

One of the favorite topics of alternative history (and one of the scenarios endlessly replayed in war games such as Axis & Allies and 3rd Reich) is what if Germany had attempted Operation Sea Lion. Assuming a Luftwaffe victory over the Royal Air Force in the Battle of Britain was Sea Lion feasible in other respects? Could Hitler have knocked the United Kingdom out of the war in the summer of 1940 or would the attempt have led to his first major defeat?

on: Sep 1 2011 - 7:22pm

The German assault on Poland began at 4:45 am on September 1, 1939. The Polish air force, dispersed prior to the invasion, instead of rising en masse to challenge the Luftwaffe, saw its numbers quickly whittled down in a misguided hope to preserve its striking power. The Polish army fought mostly alone, while German planes pounded the Polish capital. Within just two weeks, German artillery and airpower had killed over 60,000 of Warsaw's citizens.

on: Aug 19 2011 - 4:17pm

By August of 1942 reinforcements sent to assist Army Group B's drive on Stalingrad had transformed the German Sixth Army from a potent assembly of men and machines to the most powerful army in the world, with 22 divisions and supporting units under the command of General Friedrich Paulus. Facing the Sixth Army, and Fourth Panzer Army's seven German and four Romanian divisions, was a Soviet Stalingrad Front that had been decimated in July.

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