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Armor

One of The Biggest Tank Battles You Have Probably Never Heard About

on Fri, 07/25/2014 - 16:35

As we approach the 70th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising I thought it would be appropriate to set the stage for the brave but doomed efforts of the Polish Resistance to free their city from Nazi occupation. Late in July of 1944 and as the Red Army approached Warsaw's outskirts it must have seemed as if the Soviet war machine was unstoppable. Alas, this would prove not to be true.

Even though much of the blame for the failure of the Polish Resistance to overcome their Nazi overlords must be placed at Stalin's feet (with his decision to not raise a finger to help the courageous resistance

The Sherman VC "Firefly"

on Wed, 04/17/2013 - 19:12

During WWII's Normandy Campaign the inability of Allied tanks to compete against their German foes, primarily in terms of armored protection and armamanent, was and remains today a fairly well known story. Nevertheless, what is often forgotten is that by the summer of 1944 the British had found a simple, relatively cost effective solution to the problems posed by hard hitting German AFV's (Armored Fighting Vehicles).

What the British had discovered was that if they took a 17-pounder L/55 anti-tank gun and employed tungsten armor-piercing rounds powered by a higher than normal amount of

New Guest Author Article

on Wed, 03/20/2013 - 16:46

Another new "long-form" article is up in the Articles Section of The Globe At War. The U.S. 9th Armored Division in the Liberation of Western Czechoslovakia 1945 is by Bryan J. Dickerson, a military historian and former Religious Program Specialist 1st Class in the U.S. Navy Reserve and veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom (having served in Iraq twice with units of the II Marine Expeditionary Force / 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing). His article takes a look at one aspect of the often overlooked final days of the Second World War in Europe; as well as offers a succinct overview of late war U.S.

The U.S. 9th Armored Division in the Liberation of Western Czechoslovakia 1945

on Wed, 03/20/2013 - 16:03

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

Introduction

On the morning of 7 May 1945 and as the Third Reich collapsed, soldiers of Combat Command A (CCA), U.S. 9th Armored Division mounted up their vehicles and resumed their advance eastward further into north-western Czechoslovakia.  Temporarily attached to the 1st Infantry Division, CCA’s mission was to liberate the Czech city of Karlovy Vary.  CCA’s task forces rolled forward against negligible German resistance. Nevertheless, after only a couple hours, higher headquarters radioed orders for CCA to halt its forces in place.

New Guest Author Article

on Tue, 03/05/2013 - 18:43

Another new "long-form" article is up in the Articles Section of The Globe At War. There at the End: The U.S. 16th Armored Division's Liberation of Plzen is by Bryan J. Dickerson, a military historian and former Religious Program Specialist 1st Class in the U.S. Navy Reserve and veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom (having served in Iraq twice with units of the II Marine Expeditionary Force / 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing). His article takes a look at the often overlooked final days of the Second World War in Europe; as well as offers a succinct overview of late war U.S.

There at the End: The U.S. 16th Armored Division’s Liberation of Plzen

on Sat, 03/02/2013 - 18:49

By Bryan J Dickerson*

Prologue – Plzen, Czech Republic, Saturday 6 May 2000,

On this warm sunny day, I stood among several hundred people who had gathered on Husova Street; several blocks from Plzen’s Republic Square.  55 years ago on this very day, soldiers of the U.S. 16th Armored Division had rolled into Plzen and liberated its people from six oppressive years of German occupation (pictured here - Photo Courtesy of Jaroslav Peklo).  Later on that same day, other soldiers from the U.S. 97th and 2nd Infantry Divisions had arrived to help secure the city.

The T-34 in WWII: The Legend vs.The Performance

on Tue, 02/26/2013 - 02:14

By Nigel Askey*

The technical superiority of the T-34 (with a T-34/76 pictured here) in 1941,and during WWII in general has become the stuff of legend. Its apparent superiority has become so entrenched in the psyche of post WWII authors that it is now assumed without question. Some go as far as to claim the T-34 as “the finest tank of the twentieth century”, and that the T-34 “rendered the entire fleet of German tanks as effectively obsolete”.[1]

However, if battle performance was, and indeed still is, the ultimate determinant of the effectiveness of any weapon system, then unlike some

Was the Panzer V "Panther" Worth It?

on Thu, 03/01/2012 - 02:08

Though the Panzer V "Panther" is often lauded as one of the Second World War's top tanks there is a serious question as to whether the immense resources put into developing and fielding this tank was worth it. Though a new tank design when it first appeared in the Wehrmacht's ranks during the summer of 1943, the Panzer V owed much to the superb T-34 that had spurred the Panther's development. That said, the effort to produce a new medium tank to replace the Panzer III and IV had actually started in 1938. However, the developmental process had been hamstrung by a variety of problems.

Bastogne's Besieged Defenders

on Mon, 12/19/2011 - 21:32

The Battle of the Bulge that began on December 16, 1944 is widely remembered today as the greatest battle fought by the U.S. Army during the Second World War. For many, the focal point of this remembrance remains the Belgian town of Bastogne. Bastogne was a critical regional communications hub, ultimately encircled and besieged by German forces from December 19th to the 26th. The elite U.S.

Top Tank During the 1940 Battle for France?

on Sat, 10/22/2011 - 13:18
Char B1 Bis
14% (3 votes)
Panzer IV Ausf. D
55% (12 votes)
Somua S35
5% (1 vote)
Matilda II
9% (2 votes)
Panzer III Ausf. E, F
18% (4 votes)
Total votes: 22