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Armor and Blood Book Review Published

on Wed, 04/30/2014 - 18:54

Good Afternoon. I just wanted to let everybody know that the Michigan War Studies Review has published my review of Dennis Showalter's Armor and Blood: The Battle of Kursk: The Turning Point of World War II. I am happy to say that this is a wonderful book, unlike the last book I reviewed for them (David Stahel's lamentably lacking Operation Typhoon), especially in terms of introducing the general World War II enthusiast to an accurate and well written description of this very important battle.

Operation Barbarossa's Best Tank

on Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:21

We have a new poll up. For those of you who have read my book it is no mystery that armored warfare is by far my favorite aspect of the Second World War. In particular, my research and interests are overwhelmingly directed at the great armored clashes of the German-Soviet 1941-1945 war. As such, I am looking forward to your responses to our new poll question.

There were obviously a number of different tank models deployed by the Red Army and Wehrmacht during Nazi Germany's June 1941 invasion of the Soviet Union; named Operation Barbarossa.

The Movie "Patton", The Battle for Metz, and Task Force Baum

on Fri, 03/14/2014 - 20:31

Since I was a kid one of my all time favorite WWII movies was "Patton." For those of you who have spent the past half century living under a rock the film, originally released in 1970, is not only about one of the most iconic and controversial Generals in U.S. Army history, but also starred George C. Scott, who deservedly won an Academy Award for his portrayal of U.S. Army Four Star General George S. Patton.

Now, there is no question the film is far from perfect.

Oldest Known Holocaust Survivor Dies at Age 110

on Sat, 03/01/2014 - 15:38

Ok, on the one hand I don't want this website to be known as the WWII obituary page. On the other hand, a number of very notable participants in or survivors of the Second World War have passed away of late. And when it comes to someone like Alice Herz-Sommer...well let's just say that it behooves us to take note of her passing.

Alice Herz-Sommer was a remarkable person, and her advanced age of passing is only one of many things for which she should be remembered.

HMCS Sackville: Canada's Sole Surviving WWII Corvette

on Sun, 02/16/2014 - 18:17

In Halifax Harbor, Nova Scotia Canada sits one of the more unique Second World War era museum ships: the HMCS Sackville. The Sackville was one of 123 Flower Class Corvettes to serve with the Royal Canadian Navy during the Second World War. As of this writing it is the last of its kind.

Corvettes are small multi-role ships that for centuries have served as a key component of the world's naval powers. Dating back to the Age of Sail, corvettes have traditionally been smaller than frigates; but larger than offshore or coastal patrol craft.

German Police Recover 1,500 Nazi Looted Works of Art

on Fri, 02/07/2014 - 16:00

German police have recently recovered 1,500 mostly modernist works of art - including from artists such as Picasso, Chagall, and Matisse. The entire haul, estimated to be worth over €1 Billion, was discovered in the flat of a Munich resident late last year.

The art was originally confiscated by the Nazi's during the 1930's and 1940's. From there it ended up in the hands of art collector Hildebrand Gurlitt who upon his death passed on the trove of great works to his son Cornelius.

Japanese WWII Soldier Who Didn't Surrender Until 1974 Dies at Age 91

on Mon, 01/27/2014 - 19:14

On January 16, 2014 former Imperial Japanese Army Intelligence Officer Hiroo Onoda passed away in Tokyo at age 91. Onoda, a veteran of the Second World War, had an otherwise unremarkable wartime service record but for what he did after the Japanese September 1945 surrender to the Allies.

In December of 1944 Onoda had been ordered to Lubang Island in the Philippines (which the Japanese had taken from the U.S. in 1942). In October of 1944 U.S.

2,000 Tons of Unexploded WWII Bombs Found Each Year in Germany

on Wed, 01/22/2014 - 14:50

Though the Third Reich started it, the Allies ended it in spectacular fashion: with that "it" being WWII. As part of the comprehensive crushing of Germany required to defeat Hitler's regime the Allies dropped roughly 1.9 million tons of bombs on Germany during the war, with the vast majority of this destruction coming in the war's final year. During the entirety of the Allied Combined Bomber Offensive (a round the clock offensive led by the British Royal Air Force at night and United States Army Air Force during the day) approximately 500,000 Germans were killed.

If that were the end of

Naval History on the Delaware

on Thu, 12/05/2013 - 22:32

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

For naval enthusiasts and historians, there exists a unique opportunity on the Philadelphia / Camden waterfronts of the Delaware River. There one can physically walk through nearly a hundred years of naval history and technological development. 

Berthed on the Pennsylvania side of the river are the cruiser USS Olympia and the submarine USS Becuna (see first picture).  Just a couple hundred yards away on the New Jersey side sits the battleship USS New Jersey (see second, or bottom, picture).  Having completed their service to the Navy and the nation, all three retired

New Book Review Published

on Fri, 10/25/2013 - 14:12

The Michigan War Studies Review (MiWSR) has just published my latest book review. This is my third review for MiWSR (a scholarly journal affiliated with the Michigan War Studies Group) and it is of David Stahel's Operation Typhoon: Hitler's March on Moscow, October 1941. Unlike the previous two work's I have reviewed for MiWSR this is unfortunately a book that I found quite lacking.

Though the book has some commendable qualities, it's overall impact is to further obscure just why and how the Second World War reached the conclusion it did.

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